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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Ah so whilst replacing the seals on my e61 I have broken the insulin valve - the top section sheared off!

615f9cd9862e748b03ce89990c4879a6.jpg


Looks like Bella barista do them, though I'm not sure if they are the same size - seems e61 components vary a bit.

Also, the springs in the e61 kit from Bella barista are longer. Should I still use them? Not sure...
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
El carajillo said:
How much longer ? (springs) Where you holding the stem of the valve in a vice while you worked on it ?

Measure the total length of your valve and ask for one the same length
:good:
No I just had it gripped in some pliers, annoying! Got the others off fine.. I also meant infusion valve not insulin valve!!

Piccy below of springs... one is about 1cm longer, one the same, one about 5mm longer.

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These threads are so satisfying.

The scale wasn't terrible in your machine (Mushroom looks bad, but not the worst) but getting it all ***** and span yourself is really enjoyable work.
 

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If you count the coils , on two of them they appear to have the same number. I think the old ones have become tired from heat and compression.

( You get the same problem on valve springs in cylinder heads on cars ) I would go ahead and fit them, you will quickly find out if they are too strong / tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
El carajillo said:
If you count the coils , on two of them they appear to have the same number. I think the old ones have become tired from heat and compression.

( You get the same problem on valve springs in cylinder heads on cars ) I would go ahead and fit them, you will quickly find out if they are too strong / tight.
I've fitted them. They seem ok. Now just need to get a new infusion valve.

Oh yeh, I had to take out the boiler fill elbow joint, and I sealed it back with loctite 2701, but I've just read that potentially loctite can make water taste foul - what do you reckon with that? Remove and replace with teflon tape or leave it?
 

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meph137 said:
I've fitted them. They seem ok. Now just need to get a new infusion valve.

Oh yeh, I had to take out the boiler fill elbow joint, and I sealed it back with loctite 2701, but I've just read that potentially loctite can make water taste foul - what do you reckon with that? Remove and replace with teflon tape or leave it?
I've had a lot of success with Fernox LSX - it's potable water safe and good to over boiling point.

LEAK SEALER LS-XExternal Leak Sealer and Jointing Compound Ideal for use on compression joints and screwedfittings Never sets rock hard, joints can easily be undone Ready to use, no mixing Does not shrink or crack with age Suitable for use from below freezing point to aboveboiling point of water Completely safe to use with drinking water WRAS - Approved Product
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
lake_m said:
I've had a lot of success with Fernox LSX - it's potable water safe and good to over boiling point.

LEAK SEALER LS-XExternal Leak Sealer and Jointing Compound Ideal for use on compression joints and screwedfittings Never sets rock hard, joints can easily be undone Ready to use, no mixing Does not shrink or crack with age Suitable for use from below freezing point to aboveboiling point of water Completely safe to use with drinking water WRAS - Approved Product
So I suppose the question is, remove the loctite or not?
:)
I'm not even sure how to remove the stuff!
 

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You need to remove it, it is not intended for use in contact with food / water for consumption. The fitting will be tight as this is a permanent locking medium but quite possible. Clean up is with Loctite solvent and abrasion/ scraping from threads with a scriber / sharp instrument. GET IT OUT.
 

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Be quick, this is a proper thread locker and will contaminate water. It may take up to 72h to harden completely so it won't be at full strength yet. If you are struggling, heat it up, it will weaken the bond (perhaps a heat gun or hair dryer?). Either way, the garage should be able to still undo it with an impact gun, it will add extra 20-40Nm of prevailing torque but it's nothing for the gun.

I haven't sealed my element yet but was hopeful that PTFE tape and the usual gasket will do the trick, and if not that Fernox stuff sounds pretty good and can be easily applied externally only when unsuccessful with PTFE+gasket..

BTW. did the garage had a socket that was deep enough to clear the terminals on the heating element?
 

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destiny said:
Be quick, this is a proper thread locker and will contaminate water. It may take up to 72h to harden completely so it won't be at full strength yet. If you are struggling, heat it up, it will weaken the bond (perhaps a heat gun or hair dryer?). Either way, the garage should be able to still undo it with an impact gun, it will add extra 20-40Nm of prevailing torque but it's nothing for the gun.

I haven't sealed my element yet but was hopeful that PTFE tape and the usual gasket will do the trick, and if not that Fernox stuff sounds pretty good and can be easily applied externally only when unsuccessful with PTFE+gasket..

BTW. did the garage had a socket that was deep enough to clear the terminals on the heating element?
Fortunately it was the boiler fill elbow he used the threadloc on not the element but still sooner out the better
 

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You can pretty much seal any of the pipes with PTFE, when i took apart my VBM it looked like there was a 1-2mm gasket on all of the joints but this just turned out to be a crudload of PTFE wound around the end of the thread and then compressed when it was screwed in.

I replaced a lot of in in the same fashion when putting it back together and has worked a treat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
destiny said:
Be quick, this is a proper thread locker and will contaminate water. It may take up to 72h to harden completely so it won't be at full strength yet. If you are struggling, heat it up, it will weaken the bond (perhaps a heat gun or hair dryer?). Either way, the garage should be able to still undo it with an impact gun, it will add extra 20-40Nm of prevailing torque but it's nothing for the gun.

I haven't sealed my element yet but was hopeful that PTFE tape and the usual gasket will do the trick, and if not that Fernox stuff sounds pretty good and can be easily applied externally only when unsuccessful with PTFE+gasket..

BTW. did the garage had a socket that was deep enough to clear the terminals on the heating element?
Cheers for the advice. I removed the elbow and threadlock at lunch. I used a fine screwdriver to scrape it all out, though it's pretty hard to get the angle right to remove from the female boiler thread - anyone got any advice on the best way to remove? It certainly looks like it's all gone but I wanna be very very sure!! I.e should I be using chemicals to remove it or just a screwdriver and a wire brush?

Yeh the garage had a socket that was deep enough. It wasn't actually a perfect fit for the element but it worked and didn't cause any damage. It seemed slightly larger than 36mm, perhaps imperial?

Regarding the heating element - would the gasket alone not do the job of sealing don't you reckon?
 

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To remove any residue you will need the Loctite solvent then clean the boiler thoroughly afterwards , boiling water should do the trick.

The socket would be the old imperial 1 1/2 " = 38 mm , quite common on vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
El carajillo said:
To remove any residue you will need the Loctite solvent then clean the boiler thoroughly afterwards , boiling water should do the trick.

The socket would be the old imperial 1 1/2 " = 38 mm , quite common on vehicles.
Cheers
:)
do you reckon the solvent could have any undesired effect on the boiler in any other way?

Seems like acetone could do the trick.
 

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So I'm about to start reassembling - I've removed a fair few parts and am not au fait with all this plumbing business, so I wanted to double check my assumptions of where I would use PTFE (in replace of the factory threadlock) and where I would use nothing (because there are olives or washers), pics below - do they look correct?

Monosnap_2017_03_17_14_55_07.png

Monosnap_2017_03_17_15_01_38.png

Monosnap_2017_03_17_15_02_47.png
 

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As you say, any compression fitting with an olive will work without ptfe, for the rest, even if they are tapered threads, use ptfe.

Judging from the markings you got it right.

How did the cleaning up the threadlock with a solvent go? any weird smell?
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
destiny said:
As you say, any compression fitting with an olive will work without ptfe, for the rest, even if they are tapered threads, use ptfe.

Judging from the markings you got it right.

How did the cleaning up the threadlock with a solvent go? any weird smell?
It's currently being attacked by acetone! Hopefully I don't create another problem!!

16d26f4a3891a1c68ba27e076ee55ffe.jpg


I also read that it shines under uv light so I bought a torch and it indeed does, very useful!!

7e0cfcecdb8bfa46e6e3018b2939620b.jpg
 

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meph137 said:
So I'm about to start reassembling - I've removed a fair few parts and am not au fait with all this plumbing business, so I wanted to double check my assumptions of where I would use PTFE (in replace of the factory threadlock) and where I would use nothing (because there are olives or washers), pics below - do they look correct?

Monosnap_2017_03_17_14_55_07.png

Monosnap_2017_03_17_15_01_38.png

Monosnap_2017_03_17_15_02_47.png
Use a wras approved ptfe tape. Olives are designed to crush a little on a fitting first time so a wind or two of tape between the olive and the pipe union would be prudent.

The use of jointing compounds such as water hawk and lsx aren't recommended when fitting items like electric showers and thermostatic mixing valves because any excess can enter and clog up filters and narrow pipe work.
 
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