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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I would share a post a post from Origin coffee, which seems to be quite a significant step forward towards getting rid of the non-recyclable coffee bean packaging that we largely have to accept / overlook:

Introducing Our New 100% Home Compostable Bags

disappointing that not municipally compostable though…i wonder how many will end up in the food waste collection anyway…??
 

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I thought I would share a post a post from Origin coffee, which seems to be quite a significant step forward towards getting rid of the non-recyclable coffee bean packaging that we largely have to accept / overlook:

Introducing Our New 100% Home Compostable Bags

disappointing that not municipally compostable though…i wonder how many will end up in the food waste collection anyway…??
Does it really matter if it ends up in food waste. It’ll rot with everything else, won’t it?
Anyway. Why more people don’t make their own compost, is beyond me. It’s effectively free high quality soil.
 

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i wonder what happens with these bags if they end up in landfill? hasbean started using something similar a while ago. i live in a flat and have no access to composting facilities. we’re even having a nightmare trying to get the local council to provide regular recycling bins.
 

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i wonder what happens with these bags if they end up in landfill? hasbean started using something similar a while ago. i live in a flat and have no access to composting facilities. we’re even having a nightmare trying to get the local council to provide regular recycling bins.
My thoughts exactly. Presumably still roots down relatively quickly, I guess you just lose the benefit of compost output (similar to why food waste now managed separately)
 

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i wonder what happens with these bags if they end up in landfill? hasbean started using something similar a while ago. i live in a flat and have no access to composting facilities. we’re even having a nightmare trying to get the local council to provide regular recycling bins.
They rot like any other organic matter. Though probably a wee bit slower.
the reason it’s not possible to use municipal waste collectors. Is down to the fact the Municipals aren’t set up to handle it. thing is, they’re currently told to reject loads with what appears to be plastic mixed in.

these things rot just like your potato peelings do. So they are no problem to land fill.
 

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i had a look on google and found some conflicting stuff. some say they don’t break down in landfill, as they need the composting process to be happening. others say they do, but release methane. still, i reckon it’s better to chuck this in the general rubbish than endless plastic bags so it’s probably somewhat a positive step either way. and then some folk will obviously be putting them in their compost which would be the optimal outcome.

we don’t even have access to recycling here at the moment and even when we do, the council are very strict and limited about what can go in. loads of apparently recyclable stuff has to go in the general rubbish.
 

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Landfill is a massive compost heap. So the first excuse makes no sense.
Everything the rots creates methane. the stuff in Landfill especially. the methane, from landfills, heats homes in more enlightened areas.

yeah councils get stick for the limited stuff the except. However they are forced to take the cheapest bid, when choosing it recycling partner. It’s the Recycling partner that causes this. We have biffa here and they have been known to transfer an entire weeks worth of recycling, to landfill.
 
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