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Various - but, unsurprisingly, quite fond of a moka
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear all,

I’d appreciate your advice and perspectives on the following situation.


The deal is that last December (so it’s still under warranty) I bought a Ditting 807 Lab Sweet which I’ve been very happy with. I did a routine clean the other day for the first time (it’s only been very lightly used nearly exclusively for coarse grinding - about 15kg of beans have been through it) and I noticed that there was some damage to the outer rim of the upper burr whilst the lower burr is absolutely fine. For additional context - I didn’t align the burrs when the grinder arrived because I bought the Ditting just for brewing and I was pleased with its initial grind (there’s also a thread on Home Barista in which they discuss the pros and cons of leaving the Ditting at its factory settings).

I emailed the UK supplier and requested a new upper burr. They replied and said that they’d spoken with Ditting about the photos (attached) and Ditting have said that “the most likely” cause was a foreign object in the beans I’ve used and so the warranty doesn’t apply & that I would need to pay for a new set of burrs (both upper and lower - I’ve priced them at approx £370)

I use a great roastery for my beans (have done for approx 20 years) and whilst, of course, it’s not impossible there could have been a stone in the beans at some point over time, I doubt it and think it’s equally likely it was a prior material defect in the burr.

the questions I have would include:
  • if it was a foreign object caught in the burr wouldn’t the lower burr have been affected too?
  • do you think the damage is minor enough that I should just forget about it?
  • or, on the other hand, should £3k for a grinder ensure tip-top burrs & is it unreasonable to expect Ditting/the UK supplier to source a replacement upper burr?
many thanks in advance for any input, I’m obviously not objective in this situation and it would be helpful to get a more neutral perspective.

very best wishes,

Paul.
 

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If that was a stone then it was a very small one to only seem to damage the very edge of the burr. Seems strange that it wouldn't have left any scarring on the other burr as well.

Unfortunately I think you are probably out of luck as you've owned it for 9 months and have only brought up the issue. If you look at it from their perspective, what is more likely. A weird manufacturing fault or a foreign object in a grinder someone is using.

As is always the case with these things, don't take it personally and try to imagine things from the companies point of view. You may be honest but how many people aren't.

Is the quality of grind being impacted by this? You might have more joy on Home-barista with this question as I don't think that many people have these grinders over here.
 

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Premium Member
Various - but, unsurprisingly, quite fond of a moka
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks very much for the reply. The issue that’s bugging me is a) the notion that “the most likely” cause is a stone which acknowledges that they don’t know for sure but are making the assumption that most benefits them and disadvantages the customer. b) they are runNing with that assumption but there’s no obvious way in which a stone/foreign object could have caused the pattern of damage …

thanks again,

Paul.
 

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Premium Member
Various - but, unsurprisingly, quite fond of a moka
Joined
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17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have seen / changed burr's damaged by stone and metal pins/ nails, they are nothing like that.
To me that looks more like a flaw / fault in the casting.
Hola El Carajillo!
thanks very much for the input, it will be interesting to see if it chimes with other people’s experience.

best,

Paul.
 
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